Yoga retreats are temporary breaks from the daily routine that typically last from the weekend to a week or more. The purpose of a retreat is to allow yogis to deepen their practice without the distractions of life. A yoga retreat is an amazing opportunity to meet others who are passionate about yoga.

Yoga and hiking retreat is a combination of yoga and physical activity outdoors. A retreat starts and ends on a certain date, which means that you will be with the same group of people every day. You go to the same classes, have meals together, and spend a day outdoors hiking together. This gives you the opportunity to actually get to know them and develop a friendship. Yoga and hiking retreat is not just another vacation, it is a powerful experience.

A yoga retreat will help you:

  • disconnect and reflect,
  • deepen your yoga practice and knowledge,
  • step outside of your comfort zone,
  • improve your health.

If you are a beginner or not so passionate about yoga, a yoga and hiking retreat will offer you the opportunity to start with regular practice and find out how yoga can help you find balance in your everyday life.

Why hiking and yoga?

"Going back to nature is going back to the origin of life, to the origins of ourselves." This is what the philosopher Henry David Thoreau said about connecting to your inner self. There is plenty of time for self-reflection during the long hours of walking. We will encounter quite some obstacles, being far away from home and out of our comfort zone. But we might also realize what truly matters to us in our lives and what the purpose of our lives may be.

The question "Who am I?" is the ultimate question in yoga philosophy. This is exactly why connecting with nature and practicing yoga simultaneously form a perfect combination. Both will help you learn about your true self. The yoga and hiking retreat is a simple way to reconnect with your inner self and understand yourself better.

Read more about our yoga and hiking retreats in Norway and Alaska.

Hiking versus walking the Camino de Santiago

Walking the Camino de Santiago has been and still is on a bucket list for many people. Yoga and hiking retreat is like walking the Camino but it is a softer version of the Camino way. You know where you are going to sleep every night and you always have wi-fi when you need it. You will also prepare your body for a long day outdoors with morning yoga sessions, stretch and relax your tired muscles every evening and eat healthy and nutritious food during the journey.

However, yoga and hiking will give you many of the Camino walk benefits. Additionally, spending days in the fresh air will prevent you from becoming infected with viruses and will strengthen your immune system.

Top 3 reasons why people walk the Camino de Santiago

Camino de Santiago, known in English as the way of St. James, is a network of pilgrims' ways or pilgrimages leading to the shrine of the apostle Saint James the Great in the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia in Spain.

Spiritual reasons

Many pilgrims walk to connect and discover the deeper meaning of life, to spiritually connect with nature or themselves, or walk to find answers to deep questions.

Disconnect to reconnect

In a world of busyness with too many obligations and long workdays, many of us have become disconnected and disillusioned. We all say we would like to disconnect a bit but typical vacations are anything but answering e-mails at the pool and watching or reading the news after dinner, we seem never to have the opportunity to truly "get away from it all". At first, it may seem strange to not constantly think about what is going on in your country or not check your phone every 15 minutes but soon you find peace and silence in the journey. It takes a few days to adjust but the reward is clarity and a feeling of peace.

Exercise and well-being

The majority of people have little to no experience in walking long distances over many days. A popular saying is "your Camino begins when you sign up". You begin to research what shoes to bring, how to train and prepare your body, and what you should pack. Many people start training, to become healthier and more fit for the trip.

"There is no bad weather, only bad clothing" - Swedish and Norwegian proverb

Here I will share some tips on how to choose good hiking clothes to keep you warm, dry, and happy during your adventures in Norway or Alaska. I will not recommend any specific brands because in different regions you can find similar products from different manufacturers.

Check out our yoga and hiking retreats in Norway and Alaska.

Hiking clothing - layers, zippers, and pockets

When I moved to Norway in 2013, I started hiking in my jeans, aerobic leggings and top, running shoes, and a light jacket. Although Norwegians thought it was strange (jeans are especially despised), I was not disturbed by it. My hikes were usually short and close to home. With time my hikes became longer and more complicated and I started to buy special hiking equipment. I discovered that the little improvements really made a difference! For example, my backpacks got bigger but lighter and I replaced all my pants and jackets with ones that have ventilation zippers.

You start to notice the importance of clothing when you hike for several days in a row, your hike lasts for the whole day, or the weather changes suddenly. When you hike uphill you always get hot and sweaty. The contrast becomes clear when you reach the top of the mountain which is usually windy and cool. If you want to sit down to eat, relax and enjoy the view, you instantly feel the cold creeping in. On the way down your legs are already tired so you must take extra care not to stumble and fall. That means hiking at a slow pace with sweaty clothes and rubbing shoes. Suddenly you may find that hiking is not so enjoyable anymore. Fortunately, all this is avoidable when you take advice from experienced hikers.

The most important thing about hiking clothes is layering. This tried-and-true strategy helps you to regulate temperature by slipping layers on and off as your activity level or the weather changes. You may not want to wear a lot of layers at the start of your hike but it’s a good idea to take them with you on every outing - you can peel off layers when you get hot but you can’t put on layers that you didn’t bring along.

The base layer should wick sweat off your skin

I am not going to talk about underwear which should be comfortable every day, not only when hiking. But I want to talk about T-shirts. Wool is very popular in Norway: summer wool, merino wool, smart wool, old fashion wool, etc. If I'm honest, I don't go along with fashion trends easily, but buying myself a light, summer merino wool T-shirt was a very good idea.

When hiking with a backpack, your shirt must have sleeves. It is very uncomfortable to feel the backpack strap under a sweaty armpit on a warm summer day. A cotton T-shirt is not the best choice because it dries slowly. I recommend light wool or synthetic T-shirt for warm weather or a long-sleeved shirt for cooler weather. Choose materials that insulate, wick moisture, and dry quickly.

The same goes for socks. A hiking sock is crucial to prevent blisters. A hiking sock, unlike a cotton sock, provides significant protection against rubbing that your boot might cause. Low-cut socks are not a good choice for hiking, choose crew socks instead.

Middle layer should insulate

Of course, it all depends on the weather but you should always have a long-sleeved sweater or a fleece in your bag. I love fleece hoodies because I always forget my hat at home and they help to keep my head warm. I prefer light hoodies that breathe well. Pullover hoodies might be difficult to put on, so I prefer ones that have zippers.

Down insulated jackets are my favorites because they are highly compressible and easy to pack in your bag, also down offers more warmth for its weight than any other insulating material.

Outer layer should shield you from rain and wind

The outer layer (or shell layer) protects you from wind, rain, and snow. Shells range from pricey mountaineering jackets to simple wind-resistant jackets. Most allow at least some perspiration to escape; virtually all are treated with a durable water repellent finish to make water bead up and roll off the fabric.

Your outer shell is an important piece in stormy weather because if wind and water are allowed to penetrate to inner layers, you can get really cold. Pit zips under the armpit are again important. The ideal would be lightweight, wind, and waterproof material but usually, if you want significant protection against the rain and wind then you might need to make a trade-off on weight.

Hiking pants

I think I would love hiking pants that can be turned into shorts by unzipping the long pant legs. Unfortunately, I do not have them yet. But I have several breathable, windproof hiking pants with ventilation zippers and I really love them. It is important for me that they also have pockets with zippers - the more the better. Otherwise, my keys, phone, and other things would disappear fast. The material of hiking pants is also crucial. Your pants should be lightweight, soft, stretchy, and windproof. I also have a pair for heavy rain. It is important that you do not have to take your boots off when you pull on your rain pants. That means a zipper on the side of the pants.

Hiking boots or shoes

One of the most important things you wear on the trail is shoes. Low-cut models with flexible midsoles are excellent for hiking on a warm summer day. I prefer lightweight, flexible, mid or high-cut hiking boots with a good grip. My boots are not 100% waterproof but they are water-resistant. Always wear your new shoes at home or on short hikes before going out on longer hikes. After hiking remove the insoles of the shoes and clean them properly. Remember to also reapply for a DWR treatment every once in a while.  

Will you be fully vaccinated soon? Or have you taken your COVID-19 vaccination and are looking to travel sometime in the near future?

As vaccines are being rolled out across the world, it brings the promise of a return to our pre-pandemic life, or, at the very least, something close to it.

That said, it’s important to keep in mind that while these shots do come with some protection against the virus, some regulations, such as lifting the mandated use of masks, may not be happening as soon as we’d hoped.

Should you choose to travel sometimes in the near future, it’s highly advisable to continue to take health & safety precautions, such as wearing a mask, washing your hands often, and maintaining the practice of physical distancing.

While it’s not mandatory, you should also consider getting tested 3 to 5 days after arrival and self-isolate for 7 days, even though you are fully vaccinated. We are still unsure as to how much protection the vaccines offer against the new variants of the virus (and the strains continue to emerge), so, it’s always better to be safe.

In short, being fully vaccinated does give you more ‘freedom’ and peace of mind when it comes to travel but it’s in you & your fellow travelers’ best interest to maintain precautions when traveling.

Not only is it crucial for us to ‘adhere’ to local rules but also to keep personal consideration and precaution for the sake of your and others’ health and safety.

Even if you are fully vaccinated, these days, the type of travel you choose to take matters more than ever.

Domestic travel has been returning slowly but steadily starting last summer. With the rollout of vaccines, countries that are likely to reach herd immunity faster, maybe a ‘safer’ choice for locals and non-locals alike.

Many travelers are now choosing destinations that are off-the-beaten paths, those that are away from condensed cities, and often, these places are immersed in nature.

A yoga retreat in nature is a great choice for any traveler. Some retreats are easy-going while others go above and beyond to offer a wealth of activities. But no matter where you choose to go, it is easy to combine other outdoor activities such as hiking, walking, cycling, or running with your yoga sessions.

To get to your travel destination, road trips are recommended as non-public transportation is safer than using public transportation. In fact, according to the CDC, fully vaccinated travelers who go on a road trip and are moderately careful at the destination, would have a relatively ‘safe trip’.   

Another way to lower risk is to choose to visit a country that is waiving restrictions for fully vaccinated travelers. At the time this article was written, only a handful of countries have gone this route, but, as summer approaches and the vaccine passports are likely to become a reality, more and more countries would consider this option to open for travel.

Lastly, should you choose to travel internationally, it’s better to focus on visiting one country, rather than opting for a multi-country itinerary. Now is the perfect time to focus on slowing down, taking longer to explore a country, immerse in its culture and traditions, and discover local gems.

It’s also important to keep in mind that while the entry requirements into a certain country might not include showing a negative test, the airline might require one to board the plane. Do your due diligence and check the requirements ahead of time so that you can plan accordingly.

Nothing supports our mind and soul to open up like a natural setting. The usual distractions are far away, and your attention and focus are directed towards what’s in front of you, quieting the mind and simplifying your thoughts.

Being in nature awakens your senses – touch, scent, sight – and you cannot help but become more aware of what’s around you and start to appreciate the little things you might usually take for granted.

The smell of morning dew and flowers, a simple bird song, a gentle breeze in your hair, touching the grass or sand, provide stimulation and make you more present. You become more in tune with yourself and the world around you.

On most retreats held in nature, you’ll have the opportunity to do some forest bathing. Also known as Shinrin-yoku, this is the practice of making contact with and taking in the forest atmosphere to receive mental and physical healing.

Read more about our yoga and hiking retreats in Norway, Alaska, and Estonia.

Where have we been:

Day 1 - Atlantic Road Trip & hiking to Sjurvarden 667 m.a.s.l. The top of the mountain was inside the cloud. Due to the bad weather, strong wind and fog, we only came on the half way up to the "stein hytta" or stone cabin, where we were eating our lunch. On the way down the Sun came out again and trip went on by driving to Atlantic Road and visiting the sharming old fishing village Bud. The fishing village has a rich history, and in the 16th century Bud was one of the largest trading venues between Bergen and Trondheim. 

Day 2 - hiking to "Ski hytta" 150 m.a.s.l. close to Molde city center and walkin in the forest.

Day 3 - Troll Church 484 m.a.s.l. Marble Cave hiking and swimming in the mountain lake. 

The Troll church consists of three exciting limestone grottos with underground streams and waterfalls. The two lower grottos have beautiful waterfalls that cascade 14 metres down into a white marble pool. The uppermost one consists of long underground passages. On the surface to the west of the uppermost grotto there is a fishing lake with white marble "jetties". The mountain behind the Trolls' church is very distinctive, with jagged points and spires.

Day 4 - Drive to Troll Road and hiking up Kløvstien 858 m.a.s.l. 

Trollstigen – The Troll’s road – is an impressive piece of road building where the road snakes and climbs its way up and up along steep mountainsides. Every bend has its own name, most of them named for one of the foremen that led the construction gangs that built the road. The bends and curves bear witness to the skill of the constructors, built up on the base rock of the steep mountainsides, or hewn by hand into the mountain itself.

The road is narrow with a gradient of 9 %, but passing pockets have been incorporated and traffic normally flows without problem. The longest permitted length of vehicles is 13.1 metres.

Trollstigen, with its characteristic waterfall, Stigfossen, is encircled by mighty mountains, reaching an impressive 1600 masl. 

Kløvstien is an old path connecting Romsdalen and Sunnmøre, used by traders for centuries. This path has been an important fairway for the settlers on the other side of the mountian, who travelled to the market place in Romsdalen.

Day 5 - Romsdalseggen hike 1200 m.a.s.l.  11 km

From the ridge, you can see the majestic Trollveggen cliff, surrounded by a number of well-known mountains. Romsdalseggen ridge is one of the most spectacular backdrops in the world, not far from the mountaineering capital Åndalsnes.

The stone cabin Ottarbu is situated on Nesaksla, where you can seek shelter if necessary. The last section down the Romsdalstrappa rock steps back to Åndalsnes starts here. This section is relatively steep. Rampestreken viewpoint is a must for photo opportunities. 

Romsdalseggen ridge is one of the world’s most scenic hikes (Lonely Planet 2011). This hike through the dramatic landscape features many highlights. From the ridge, you can see the majestic Trollveggen cliff, surrounded by a number of well-known mountains. Romsdalseggen ridge is one of the most spectacular backdrops in the world, not far from the mountaineering capital Åndalsnes.

  • Total distance: 10,5 km
  • Total time: 6/8 hrs
  • Total hight: 1222 m.a.s.l. Mjølvafjellet
  • Difficulty level: 4/5 - moderate difficult hill walk, some scrambling involved, short exposed sections.

The ascent is hard-going and steep, but the view that awaits you at the top is well worth the effort! From the ridge, you look directly at the legendary Trollveggen cliff, Europe’s highest perpendicular rock face – crowned by rugged mountains. To the southeast, you can see the Dalsida landscape protection area, which extends all the way to the Dovrefjell and Sunndalsfjella mountains, with the highest peak Snøhetta.

The mountains Romsdalshorn and Store Venjetind tower-like spires into the sky. It is not hard to understand why this sea of jagged peaks, ridges, and wild precipices has drawn mountaineers to the area for centuries. To the southwest, you can see Reinheimen National Park and the well-known mountains Bispen, Kongen and Dronninga. From Romsdalseggen ridge, you also get a view of Romsdalen valley, with the Rauma river winding its way through the lush landscape out to the fjord and Åndalsnes.

Romsdalseggen

How to get in Romsdalseggen trailhead

Romsdalseggen ridge hike is not circular. It starts in Venjesdalsetra and finishes in Åndalsnes. You can take a special bus from Åndalsnes or you need two cars. The bus runs daily in the summertime, from June until September. You can book your ticket here. It is easy to find the bus stop, it is in front of the Climbing Museum or Norsk Tindesenter/Tourist Information/train station.

jooga ja matkapuhkus Norras

Romsdalseggen hiking trail

The trail is easy to follow, marked, and signposted with red dots. Besides the red trail marks, there are additional posts showing the progress of your hike.

If you are not particularly fond of airy ridges, you can take an easier path that bypasses the steepest and airiest sections. It also starts at Venjedalssetra and only forks from the main trail at 2,5th kilometer, at the plateau, and is signposted to Høgnosa. It joins back the main trail on the 7th kilometer. Taking this trail will add 2 extra kilometers to the hike. but to tell the truth, all descents and ascents which could be challenging, are secured with chains which are very helpful.

At the end of the ridge, Nesaksla has located an old, cute stone hut, a brand-new Eggen restaurant, and Romsdalens Gondola. From here it is a steep and hard descent from over 700 meters down to Åndalsnes. Despite the Sherpa steps (steep stony steps built in 2013 by Nepalese Sherpas), it can be a struggle to walk down, painful and hard on the knees.

In May 2021 opened Norway's longest skylift - The Romsdalens Gondola. Romsdalsgandolen is the longest cable car in Norway, the idea of this cable car appeared in 1964 and the ride takes about 5 minutes. The maximum speed is 10 m/s, and the climb reaches 73 percent. The cabins are able to carry 45 passengers and depart every half an hour, but it is promised to run it continuously if awaiting passengers will appear. The gondola departs from the town center of Åndalsnes (next to the Tindesenter museum) and goes to the top of Nesaksla mountain. Once at the top, you can enjoy a 360-degree view of your surroundings, including the famous peaks Romsdalshorn, Store Vengetind, and Kirketaket. Indulge not only your sense of sight but your sense of taste as well and visit Eggen Restaurant at the top of Nesaksla. The restaurant offers traditional, seasonal, and local cuisine with unobstructed views over Romsdalen. Walk along the nature paths before heading back down to Åndalsnes. You can choose to ride the gondola back down or hike down the mountain which allows you to visit the famous Rampestreken viewpoint on the way. The gondola runs year-round and is suitable for people with disabilities. 

Would you like to join us in the Romsdalseggen hike? You can see a selection of our guided day hikes here.

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